News

  • News

    This is the News section - please choose from one of the News articles below.

    • We just uploaded a new video to our YouTube channel!

      Check out this demonstration of the new DSI-VR300!

      This quick demonstration of the new DSI-VR300 is the first of many short demonstrations we have planned for our YouTube channel.

       


       

      If you enjoyed this quick demonstration let us know in the comment section of the video or on our social media. If you would like us to make videos on any other systems or software let us know! If you want to stay updated with our newest uploads subscribe to our YouTube channel!

       

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    • Passive vs. Active Electrode - Slew-Rate Problem

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      Do BioSemi active electrodes have a slew-rate problem?

      It was brought to our attention that a rumour is buzzing around among EEG researchers that there may be an inherent noise problem with active electrodes. The source of this rumour is a paper published by Sarah Laszlo et al. in 2014 (see A direct comparison of active and passive amplification electrodes in the same amplifier system). In this paper, the authors compare the performance of one particular brand (not BioSemi) active electrodes with passive electrodes, both connected to a conventional EEG amplifier (also not BioSemi). Both active and passive electrodes setups were tested with low (2 kOhm) and high (50 kOhm) electrode-to-skin impedances.

      The authors find that the total noise (250 Hz bandwidth) for passive electrodes is higher with high electrode impedance, whereas the total noise with the active electrodes is equal (and nearly as low as with passive electrodes with low impedance) for both low and high electrode impedances. However, they also determine that the number of sweeps needed to achieve a reliable ERP result is higher with high electrode impedances for both the active and passive setups. Note though, that the number of required sweeps did not show significant differences between active and passive setups.

      The paper starts to derail when the authors attempt to explain why in the tests with high skin-to-electrode impedances, the number of sweeps required for reliable ERP is similar for active and passive setups, instead of a lower number of sweeps for the active case as they would expect on the basis of the better total noise results. So although the active electrodes do not perform any worse than passive electrodes, they basically wonder why the performance is not better than it is.

      A logical first step in analyzing the above discrepancy would have been to analyze the noise spectra (for example a relatively small band of extra noise with frequencies around the ERP waveform would explain that the total noise number is hardly influenced whereas the number of required sweeps would certainly be affected). Instead, the authors choose to introduce a hypothesis without any support by measurements or references. The authors suggest that the amplifier in the used active electrodes has a slew rate that is limited to such an extent that it causes distortion of the ERP wave, leading to a higher required number of sweeps than would be expected on the basis of the total noise figures.

      It is certainly true that slew rate limitations can lead to signal distortion. The effect usually plays a role only with large (several volts) signals at high (several MHz) frequencies. Suggesting slew rate limitations as a problem for EEG signals (amplitudes in the hundreds of uV range and frequencies below a few hundred Hz) sounds far fetched.

      How extreme the hypothesis actually is, can be illustrated by some numbers. The paper shows ERP results with a bandwidth of 250 Hz and an amplitude of 6 uV. The required slew rate to acquire this waveform without distortion is approx. 0.01 V/s (min SR = 2*pi*f*Vpk-pk, see for example the Wikipedia page on Slew Rate). Now consider the standard BioSemi ActiveTwo EEG system with active electrodes. At 16 kHz sample rate, this system can acquire a 3 kHz, 0.5 Vpk-pk wave without significant distortion. The complete system (active electrodes, post-amplifier, analog-to-digital converter) therefore has a slew rate of at least 10,000 V/s (or 0.01 V/us in the more usual notation). The standard BioSemi active electrodes are also applied in a high-frequency version of the ActiveTwo system with 262 kHz sample rate. The setup accurately acquires a maximal sine wave of 80 kHz, 0.5 Vpk-pk, leading to a slew rate estimate for the standard BioSemi active electrodes of at least 0.2 V/us. This is a factor of 20 million faster than in the Laszlo hypothesis. Refer to the following result for a 20 kHz, 40 mVpk-pk input signal acquired with standard BioSemi electrodes and a 262 kHz sample rate version of the ActiveTwo system (the dots indicate sample points at 3.8 us intervals). Note the fast rise and fall times of the square wave edges indicating good slew rate performance (the plot shows rise/fall times of approx 10 us, this is a limitation for step responses of the decimation filter in the ADC).

      Designers of EEG systems, with or without active electrodes, all make use of a relatively small pool of quite similar Op-amps (building blocks for amplifier circuits) and ADCs provided by a handful of semiconductor manufacturers. These components all offer slew rates far beyond what is minimally required for EEG signals. I am therefore quite sure that our competitors can present results similar as found for the BioSemi setup. This is supported by the input range and bandwidth figures published by various manufacturers. While I would not hesitate to spread doubts about performance aspects of products by BioSemi's competitors, the limited slew rate argument is so unlikely for any currently available EEG system (with or without active electrodes) that I would never consider using it.

      In other words: it is doubtful that the particular (non BioSemi) active electrode evaluated in the paper has a slew rate with a factor of 20 million slower than the BioSemi active electrode. Anyway, such an extremely slow slew rate would have been immediately apparent in the waveforms generated by relatively large and fast artifacts in the EEG signal, such as eyeblinks. In addition, the phenomenon would have been straight forward to measure by connecting the active electrodes to a signal generator. The paper does not indicate that any attempt was made to verify the hypothesis with measurements. Given that the particular active electrodes as tested in the paper are quite widespread under EEG researchers, it is hard to imagine that a slew rate limitation of 0.01 V/s would have remained unnoticed for years among these researchers.

      The authors make things worse by stating that slew rate limitations are more severe for amplifiers "at very low output impedance". They even refer to BioSemi to support this claim. In reality, BioSemi never has made such a statement and with good reason: it simply is not true. There are numerous amplifier designs with high slew rate and low output impedance, the BioSemi active electrode as presented above is just an example.

      The last sentence of the paragraph is the most bizarre. While it is, of course, true that passive electrodes do not have the slew rate limitations associated with amplifier circuitry, the authors overlook that the input stage of an EEG amplifier for passive electrodes also has high input impedance, low output impedance and slew rate limitations. In terms of amplifier noise, input and output impedances and slew rate, the only principle difference between the active and the passive setup is the location of the first amplifier stage. The statement that "slew rate [..] is simply not an issue for passive electrodes" is therefore surprising. In reality, both active electrodes and input stages for passive electrodes have the same slew rate limitations, although as outlined above, it is unlikely that any EEG system (active or passive) using currently available electronic components will present a problem in this respect. Instead, the authors suggest that slew-rate limitation is an inherent problem encountered with all active electrodes (regardless of brand and design), whereas the effect is totally eliminated in all amplifiers for passive electrodes.

      To summarize: the paper presents an unlikely hypothesis that is not verified and not supported by any valid reference. The authors fail to do the simple measurements or numerical evaluation that would have readily falsified the hypothesis. Nevertheless, they find themselves qualified to apply this questionable hypothesis not only to the particular active electrode evaluated in the paper but to the active electrode design in general. In effect, they disqualify all active electrodes, including the successful BioSemi design, and confuse the scientific discussion about the merits of the active electrode principle. It is peculiar to see that such an unjustified accusation, that may affect legitimate manufacturers who put a lot of effort in improving EEG acquisition systems, can make it through the review process of Journal of Neuroscience Methods.

      This is an article published by Coen Metting van Rijn, PhD, director, BioSemi, 5-December 2019
    • EL-CHECK: A vital addition to any MP160 order!

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      Watch this new video from BIOPAC

      EL-CHECK measures the impedance between surface electrodes attached to a subject so you can detect and correct any electrode contact issues before you start recording data. 

      Works on all signal types—measure electrode impedance from <5kΩ to >50 kΩ for all surface biopotential measurements, including ECG, EEG, EGG, EMG, EOG, Bioimpedance, and Impedance Cardiography.

      EL-CHECK permits simultaneous connection of up to three electrode leads, for quick impedance checking between any two electrodes in the three connected leads: Active (Vin+), Reference (Vin-), and Ground (GND). Accepts standard Touchproof and BioNomadix leads.

       

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    • BioNomadix Special Offer!

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      Free Transmitter with your purchase of a BioNomadix Smart Center

      The highly compact and incredibly portable Smart Center from BIOPAC is in high demand right now and for the next couple of months, you'll receive a free transmitter with your purchase of a Smart Center system!

      Request Quote

       

      Be quick, this offer officially ends with Q1 of 2020!

       

  • Events

    This is the Event section - please choose from one of the Event articles below.

    • Nerve and Muscle Sonography Symposium

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      Sponsored in part by NEUROSPEC AG & Digitimer

      Join us for this limited event at Spital Thurgau in Münsterlingen. Together with Digitimer, we will be in part sponsoring this gathering.

      The Nerve and Muscle Sonography symposium will take place at the Kantonsspital Münsterlingen from 20-21 March 2020. Together with leading neurologists and physicians from Switzerland and Germany, you will dive into the fascinating world of Nerve and Muscle Sonography. This symposium comprises of lectures on both basic and advanced topics. Further, there will be hands-on training where you will get the chance of testing our stimulators model D185 from Digitimer. Get in touch with us to register today as the maximum number of participants is set to 40 people! 

       

      IMPORTANT UPDATE: Due to the current unforeseen spreading of the Corona Virus in Switzerland, the symposium has been postponed to the end of this year, 2020. Contact us if you wish for further updates concerning the symposium.

       

      October 2020

       

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    • New BIOPAC Webinar!

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      Integrating VR, Eye Tracking and Biofeedback in Your Research

      Don’t miss this opportunity to learn more about integrating VR, Eye Tracking and Biofeedback in your research. 

      Wednesday, March 18, 2020, 08:00 - 09:00 PT (17:00-18:00 CET).

      Register Now!  

      Virtual Reality enables researchers to create precisely controlled and effortlessly replicable experimental setups for their research. These setups allow for environments that would usually be either impossible to set-up or require an astronomical budget. Combined with real-time participant physiology data collection VR forms an incredibly powerful set-up.

      Join us for this webinar together with BIOPAC and WorldViz and learn about creating seamless VR experiments with the integration of Eye Tracking,  biometric data and real-time feedback. Learn everything there is to know from conducting VR experiments to analysing and understanding the combined data. 

      What you will learn:

      • How to set up a VR and Physiology experiment
      • How to set up Eye Tracking in VR
      • How to integrate VR, Eye Tracking, Physiology, and Biofeedback
      • How to add VR event markers to Physiology data
      • Display and analysis of Eye Tracking data

      This is Part 4 of a series of eye-tracking training. If you haven't seen the previous parts you can view Part 1: Eye Tracking Fundamentals, Part 2: Remote Eye Tracking, and Part 3: Eye Tracking Mobile Participants, at your convenience.

      Register Now! 

    • Sleep & Health Zurich (SHZ) Symposium 2020

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      Thursday, May 7, 2020

      We are excited to be sponsoring this years Sleep and Health Symposium in Zurich, Switzerland. The symposium will take place at the Kunsthaus Zurich (Heimplatz 1, Vortragssall). Leading physicians and researchers from the field of Sleep and Health will give talks on exciting topics such as "Netflix, Social Media or Relaxation? The Influence of Bedtime Activities on Sleep", "The Multifunctional Thalamus: Control of Sleep and Wake" and also speak about the future and "Where No Sleep Researcher Has Gone Before".

      Get in touch with us if you wish to join us for an exciting day talking about the latest advancements in Sleep research!

       IMPORTANT UPDATE: Due to the current unforeseen spreading of the Corona Virus in Switzerland, the symposium has been postponed to the 27th of November, 2020. Contact us if you wish for further updates concerning the symposium.

      Sleep & Health Zurich (SHZ) Symposium 2020

      Thursday, May 7, 2020

      Contact Us

    • AS4SAN 2020 UPDATE

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      The conference is being postponed to 2021!

      With the unfortunate global situation concerning the Covid-19, we are sad to inform you that the AS4SAN committee has decided to postpone the conference until further notice. We are all in this situation together and hope that you stay safe. More updates will come as soon as we know more.

      For more information keep an eye on the homepage of the AS4SAN conference.